• Tony

Review of the Nikon Z50 and Nauticam Housing

Updated October 2020

Nauticam NA-Z50 housing, WWL-C lens, and Inon Z330 strobes
The Nauticam NA-Z50 housing with WWL-C lens, and Inon Z330 strobes

Many years ago, I had extensively used a few mirrorless cameras - specifically a Sony NEX5 and NEX7. As a hardcore DSLR shooter, I did like these setups, but wasn’t impressed enough with them to consider making the switch from my regular SLR camera. The Nikon Z50 and Nauticam NA-Z50 housing has me rethinking this. 


The Nikon Z50 is the newest in Nikon’s interchangeable-lens mirrorless cameras, offering an APS-C sensor,  20 megapixels stills and 30 FPS 4k video. The kit lens it comes with is a 16-50 f3.5-6.3 Z-mount. 


In July 2020, I was fortunate enough to get my hands on a brand-new Nauticam Z50 setup for some test-diving and sample images, courtesy of Reef Photo and Video. At the time of this initial writing, I had dived the housing 6 dives, and gave my initial impressions of it below. The side effects of the Cayman Islands COVID-19 shutdown have worked in my favor, and I've had the housing this entire time. As of today, I've had the opportunity to do 2 weeks in Little Cayman aboard the Cayman Aggressor - and over 50 dives now with this little setup, and have almost 400 "keepers" in my Lightroom catalog from it. I've since edited this review to reflect my experiences and some things I've learned since my initial review.


Like all Nauticam housings, the design is well thought out and ergonomics are superb. I particularly like how even though the playback button is located on the bottom right of the camera body, some clever control routing has this function as a lever for your left thumb - consistent with many other DSLR housings. With the exception of the ISO control (something I address later in this article) every function of the camera is easy to operate with your hands on the handles. 


Nauticam NA-Z50 housing rear view
Shot of the NA-Z50 left rear, illustrating the playback lever.

The muscle memory of this setup took me a bit to get used to. Several dives were required just to get the camera set up to shoot in a manor I was accustomed to, but once I did, everything clicked, and I began to really enjoy it. 


My loaner camera came with a standard viewfinder, however since most Nauticam housings are compatible in this regard, I immediately swapped it with my personal and beloved Nauticam 45 degree viewfinder. 


Nauticam NA-Z50 housing with 45 degree viewfinder.
Nauticam NA-Z50 housing with 45 degree viewfinder.

Immediately I noticed it was very negative in the water for such a little camera. Dive 1 was mainly me flailing about as my muscle memory was off from the added weight. Easily resolved using some carbon buoyancy float arms. Using a pair of Nauticam 70x300 and a pair of H2O-Tools 30x300 arms made the setup just slightly negative, and far easier to handle. 


Top rear view of the Nauticam NA-Z50 housing
Top rear view of the Nauticam NA-Z50 housing

What I loved


The wet lenses


This particular configuration came with both the Nauticam WWL-C 130 degree wide lens, and the CMC-1 macro diopter. In my former life, if you had ever asked me about doing both macro and wide angle shooting on the same dive, I’d have given you a hard “no.” Wet lenses just weren’t up to the task. Nauticam has changed the game here, and they claim their WWL wet lens series are “mathematically sharper” than anything else in the market. I don’t doubt it. This lens surprised me in its ability to deliver sharp images corner to corner. The bayonet mounts allow for quick and easy changing from wide angle to macro and back. 


I cannot stress how good the quality of the WWL-C lens is. It allows for zoom-through shots, meaning you can use the full range of the kit lens with stunning sharpness. It has been so ingrained in me that zooming into a wide lens underwater yields horrible quality, that I didn't even attempt to do this until about my 10th dive with it. When I did, I was stunned how sharp the image was.


A shot of some children taking their Junior Open Water class. Taken at 16mm using the WWL-C.
Next shot was taken at 50mm using the WWL-C lens.
This is a crop of the above image, illustrating the clarity even when zoomed in.

The downside to the WWL-C, is that it's a wet lens, so split shots or over-under photos are not possible with this. Those looking to do split shots will need to consider another wide lens and dome combination for this camera.


Front view of the Nauticam NA-Z50 housing illustrating the bayonet port mount system.
Front view of the Nauticam NA-Z50 housing illustrating the bayonet port mount system.

Installing the CMC-1 lens onto the NA-Z50 housing
Installing the CMC-1 lens onto the NA-Z50 housing

The EVF


The electronic viewfinder surprised me. It was sharp and easy to see corner to corner. One of the nicest things I found was the ability to check my image without removing my eye from the viewfinder after my shot. I found this particularly useful for macro photography - something you just can’t do on a traditional SLR. Normally after a few shots, you need to look at your LCD screen to make sure nothing weird is happening with your strobe placement or power settings, and just to get an idea of how your shot is coming out. On a traditional SLR rig, doing this breaks your focal plane and requires you to recompose the image and focus - something that can often be easier said than done. The movement of your body or the camera required to do this action also can frighten your subject, who could get spooked and disappear on you.


With the electronic viewfinder, you don’t even need to move. The image will appear automatically or on demand without you ever needing to take your eye away. This feature is amazing and has made a huge difference in the quality of my photography. I find with macro, I'm able to get many more opportunities for a shot on my subject, and I can get the lighting and exposure dialed in far better.


Bottom rear view of the Nauticam NA-Z50 housing.
Bottom rear view of the Nauticam NA-Z50 housing.

That said, initially I found the viewfinder too bright - something easily corrected in the menu settings, but it also contributed to my images to be vastly underexposed. On my first few dives I had forgotten how to bring up the histogram function, so I found myself going by the light meter, and the preview shown on the viewfinder.  


Determining focus, either through the e-viewfinder or the LCD is super easy using the center button in the image review. A press of the center  button does a super-zoom of the shot center, allowing you to see if the image is in focus or not. 


The battery life


Battery life is shockingly good. In my past experiences with mirrorless cameras, I found the battery would last 2 or 3 dives if you were lucky. You get far more life with the Z50 battery. Out of habit I charged this battery between trips, but even after a 2-tank boat dive, I noticed the battery meter hadn’t dropped even a single bar. I’ve since stopped charging it to see how many dives I can get out of it. 


The size


The Nauticam housing for this is the N100 version, which simply means the port is 100mm across. This in my humble opinion, is the perfect size. It's compact and can travel easily, yet large enough where the controls are all ergonomic and can be comfortably accessed from the grips - something that can be hampered on smaller compact housings.


The image quality


The end result, once I got used to the differences in operation, were just as good, and mostly better than what I normally achieve on my SLR rig.


What I didn’t love


Macro Focus


The very first thing I didn't care for was the focus ability when shooting macro. Getting sharp focus when using the WWL-C wide angle was a non-issue, and otherwise flawless. It was hard to get shots that weren't in focus. However, shots in macro were far more difficult. Super macro shots using the CMC-1 were maddeningly difficult and I found myself yearning for the manual focus control of my DSLR. I noticed the lens tended to 'hunt' for focus and had a hard time actually locking on to the focus point.


To be fair, I was not using a focus light, so this could have added to my issue. Also I did manage to make the task easier by switching focus to a single point mode, and the 4-way control makes it easy to put this focus point exactly where you want, but it was more challenging than what I was used to. From looking at the lens arrangement, a manual focus control might be technically possible, but not without a major housing redesign, so that’s not likely to happen. 


In the grand scheme of things, this isn't that bad and I was still able to get some great super-macro shots with it. 



Standby timer


Initially, I found this maddening, until I got used to it. The standby timer is a user-adjustable setting that allows for the camera to go into sleep mode after a period of time, which of course is a power savings measure. The default on the Z50 is 30 second - after 30 seconds of inactivity, it will go to sleep.


Really what I disliked was not the standby timer itself, but rather the time it takes to wake the camera from sleep mode, which according to my tests is a full second. This may not seem like a long delay until you are trying to get one of those very fast shots when some unexpected activity occurs.


I find this sort of scenario happens rather often, to me anyway. I will turn and see something perfectly placed or composed, or some animal will just appear from nowhere, and I'll want to take a (sometimes blind) shot instantly. On most SLR's even when the meter has gone to sleep, you can still instantly fire off a photo. Not on the Z50. The shutter will not fire until it has woken up after this one-second delay. The best example I can give is this shark shot here:

This shot was taken about 2 seconds too late, thanks to the standby timer wake-up delay.

I was on a dive site in Little Cayman, about to examine a section of the wall, when I looked up and saw a reef shark heading right for me, only 3 feet away. He had just popped out of an adjacent canyon and I couldn't see him coming. My camera settings were about right from my previous photo and the camera was aimed in the right direction so I pulled the shutter release - and nothing. The camera was asleep. This aggravated me, as the shark was in the perfect position for what could have been a very good shot.


I found similar instances occurred many times. I got in the habit of giving the shutter a half-press when I knew I was about to take a shot of something, but occasionally one of these super quick action events would occur, and I'd miss out. You can change this in the Custom settings menu. C3 - power off delay, allows you to change the standby timer to a variety of intervals, or even off completely at the downside of shorter battery usage.


The internal flash


Like most mirrorless cameras, the camera’s internal strobe triggers your external flash. While there is a very innovative control on the left rear of the housing to activate and deactivate the internal flash, the flash tube itself is very tiny. As a result, shots taken in quick succession can cause it to overheat. When this happens, the camera will not allow you to take any more shots until it cools off. I was shooting in manual flash mode, using the absolute minimum power the flash allows (1/32nd of a second) and I still found it overheating with a reasonable frame rate. On 2 occasions I lost the opportunity for some good images, when I found my subject perfectly framed, yet the camera would not fire. 


This Painted Elysia shot below is a great example. I spent 20 minutes with this little guy, who was about 1 centimeter long. They key to success (for me anyway) with shots like this is taking lots of them to ensure your razor thin depth of field is in the right spot. I probably took hundreds of shots as he crawled up and down coral on the reef. At one point, I found him in the perfect spot, but I couldn't get the camera to fire - the flash needed to cool off.